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GIVE YOUR DOG A BOWEN

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Animal Bowen Therapy

What to expect before, during and after a Bowen session?                     
When I meet with a client for the first time, my primary goal is to get to know the animal and develop a relationship with him or her.  The first initial session may take up to 90 minutes as I like to discuss medical history, known issues and allow your pet to adjust to my presence.  Your pet is never forced to accept a Bowen session.  
I ask that you do not pet your animal for the first 24 hours.  I know this is difficult, BUT this allows the central nervous system to respond and communicate without interruption.  This is a very important part of the Bowen treatment.  Stroking around the head and face is acceptable.  He or She may be sleepy after the session or may seem energized, each one is different and unique, and I usually follow up within several days to see how things are going or if you noticed any changes.  I am always available by phone or email if you have any questions.


How many Bowen visits will my pet need?                                                   This will depend on your animal and the nature of his or her health concern.  The treatment protocol is usually three sessions spaced 5-7 days apart.  Long-standing issues may take longer to resolve, but there are no hard and fast rules.  We are working as a team, and I will always provide you with the best options for your pet, as well as respect your choices. The ultimate goal is for your pet's health and well-being.  This applies to both Bowen and Massage.

Treatments in your own home?                                                                       Yes, I do home visits and find most animals are more comfortable in their environment and it feels less like a trip to the vet's office.  If your pet is anxious or has a health issue that does not allow them to travel it is the best options for them.  I do ask that I have a large enough space to work in that is safe for me and your pet.  I do not require a table so allowing them space to move around is vital in my treatment and observations. Access to fresh water, a comfortable bed, and the
owner's presence are all that is usually required.  Please see "How should I prepare my pet for a Bowen session?" below for further information.

How should I prepare my pet for a Bowen session?
Your pet will enjoy the Bowen experience if you follow these guidelines:

  • Identify a quiet and peaceful location in your home where your pet can relax.  Your pet may wish to move around or lay down, so feel free to provide a blanket for them to use and a non-slip surface.

  • Make sure your pet has gone potty before the session begins.  It will not be an issue if they have not but will help them feel more comfortable.

  • Avoid scheduling an appointment when you are busy, stressed or cooking meals for the upcoming week.  Both your pet and I will be very distracted.


How do I diagnose?                                                                                           Please be aware that I do not diagnose or provide veterinarian advice.  In fact, I may refer you back to your Veterinarian if I do not see any changes after several treatments, as your pet's health is my utmost concern.  Many Veterinarians recognize the benefits of complementary therapies and are willing to work with Animal Bowen Therapists/Canine Massage Therapist to provide a well-rounded health treatment plan for your animal.  

Do you ever discover problems while doing a Bowen treatment (lumps, sores etc.)? How do you address the issue?
I do and have noticed things owners might not have seen or been aware and always make a note of issue in my report as well as verbally to the owner.  Depending on what I find I may continue with the Bowen, but I always inform the owner and give them a choice.  As mentioned above, I do not diagnose or provide veterinarian advice.
                                                                     
My pet is having other therapies such as Chiropractic and Massage Therapy, is it okay to combine these therapies with Bowen treatments?        
 

First, let me say I'm very pleased you are open to other healing treatments and care enough about your pet to source out other options. Having said that it might not be a good idea to combine them as it can be confusing to the animal and difficult to determine which treatment is effectively helping your pet.  I have an animal chiropractor who works on my dog, but I time her visits and my own Bowen treatment, so they are never done simultaneously.  Some alternative therapies can be combined with Bowen, such as homeopathic treatment, but please ask if you are uncertain.

What happens after the three sessions have been completed?
If your pet has improved we can connect in several weeks time to see if any further follow up is required.  Bowen can be used as a preventative healing modality, and most pets would benefit from a health care regime.   Preventative treatments can be scheduled monthly or bi-monthly, whatever works best for you and your pet.  

Are there times when my pet should not receive a Bowen treatment?
If your pet is in an acute state (heat stroke, open wounds, shock, stroke, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea) emergency veterinarian care should always be your first response.  I will gladly help with follow up care after the emergency has been addressed.

 

  

Canine Massage Therapy

What to expect before, during and after a Massage session?
When I meet with a client for the first time, my primary goal is to get to know the animal and develop a relationship with him or her.  Your pet may not relax on the floor to receive a full massage.  This is totally normal! The first appointment may take up to 90 minutes as I like to discuss medical history, known issues and allow the animal time to adjust to my presence.  Your animal is never forced to accept a massage session.
After the session, your pet may need to go potty again and will want to drink more water.  He or she may feel more tired than usual or are simply more relaxed.  If your pet is energized or wanting to sleep after the session, please allow them the time to rest and recover.  Massage can be an intense experience for them.  I am always available by phone or email if you have any questions.


How many Massage visits will my pet need?
Every animal is different, and they all present with their own unique conditions and circumstances.  Animals with serious health conditions, chronic pain or mobility may require massage once a week for several weeks.  A healthy animal might only need a massage once a month.  An animals physical condition can change over time, so we can decide together what is appropriate.  Your pets health and well being is my ultimate goal.


Treatments in your own home?
Yes, I do home visits and find most animals are more comfortable in their own environment and it feels less like a trip to the 
vets' office.  If your pet is anxious or has a health issue that does not allow them to travel it is the best options for them.  I do ask that I have a large enough space to work in that is safe for me and your pet.  I do not require a table so allowing them space to move around is vital in my treatment and observations. Access to fresh water, a comfortable bed, and the owners'
presence is all that is usually required.  Please see "How should I prepare my pet for a massage session?" below for further information.

 

How should I prepare my pet for a massage session?
Your pet will enjoy the massage experience if you follow these guidelines:

  • Identify a quiet and peaceful location in your home where your pet can relax.  Your pet will shed, so feel free to provide a blanket for your dog to use.  

  • Make sure your pet has gone potty before the session begins

  • Avoid scheduling an appointment when you are busy, stressed or cooking meals for the upcoming week.  Both your pet and I will be very distracted.

  • Avoid scheduling the appointment just after your pet has eaten.

 

 


How do I diagnose?
Please be aware that I do not diagnose or provide veterinarian advice. In fact, I may refer you back to your Veterinarian if I do not see any changes after several treatments, as 
your pet's health is my utmost concern.  Many Veterinarians recognize the benefits of complementary therapies and are willing to work with Animal Bowen Therapists/Canine Massage Therapist to provide a well-rounded health treatment plan for your animal.  

Do you ever discover problems while massaging (lumps, sores etc.)? How do you address the issue?
I do and have noticed things owners might not have seen or been aware and always make note of issue in my report as well as verbally to the owner.  Depending on what I find I may continue with the massage but I always inform the owner and give them the choice.  As mentioned above, I do not diagnose or provide veterinarian advice.

 


My pet is having other therapies such as Chiropractic and Bowen Therapy, is it okay to combine these therapies with massage treatments?
First, let me say I'm very pleased you are open to other healing treatments and care enough about your pet to source out other options.  I have an animal chiropractor who works on my dog but I time her visits with the days I will be doing massage on her to help the process.  I schedule around my own Bowen treatment so they are never done simultaneously.  Some alternative therapies can be combined with Massage treatments, such as homeopathic treatment, but please ask if you are uncertain.


Why should I pay someone to massage my dog when I massage my pet all the time?
A trained therapist has learned techniques to work with tight muscles and trigger points as well as to carefully stretch and improve range of motion. They have also been schooled in physiology, anatomy, 
behavior and much more.  Some techniques, when not administered by a trained professional can cause pain or injury.  Massage can strengthen the bond between you and your pet and I am always happy to demonstrate specific techniques that are safe and appropriate.

Are there times when my pet should not receive a Massage treatment?
If your pet is in an acute state (heat stroke, open wounds, shock, stroke, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea) emergency veterinarian care should always be your first response.  I will gladly help with follow-up care after the emergency has been addressed.  

Please contact me if you have any further questions or concerns.  I am always happy to talk about pets!